Can I ask my new employer to buy out my old company's notice period?

Want to switch jobs but stuck in a notice period? Find out if you can ask your new employer to buy out your old company's notice period in our must-read article.

As an employee looking to switch jobs, you may find yourself stuck in a notice period with your current employer. This can be frustrating, especially if you've already accepted a job offer with another company. But is it possible to ask your new employer to buy out your old company's notice period?

In short, it's not uncommon for a new employer to agree to buy out an employee's notice period. However, it's important to keep in mind that each situation is unique, and the decision to do so ultimately lies with the new employer.

Here are some things to consider if you're thinking of asking your new employer to buy out your old company's notice period:

It's important to understand the legal implications of asking your new employer to buy out your old company's notice period. In some cases, it may be considered a breach of contract to leave your current employer before the end of your notice period. This could potentially result in legal action being taken against you.

Before making a decision, it's a good idea to speak with a lawyer to understand your rights and responsibilities. They can provide you with valuable advice on how to proceed in a way that minimizes your risk of legal action.

Consider the potential impact on your relationship with your current employer

Asking your new employer to buy out your old company's notice period may not sit well with your current employer. They may feel that you're not committed to fulfilling your obligations, which could damage your relationship and potentially impact your future job prospects.

Before making a decision, it's important to consider the potential impact on your relationship with your current employer. If you value your relationship with them and want to maintain it, it may be best to serve out your notice period rather than ask your new employer to buy it out.

Negotiate with your new employer

If you decide to ask your new employer to buy out your old company's notice period, it's important to approach the situation with a clear plan in mind. You'll need to negotiate with them to come to an agreement that works for both parties.

Start by explaining the situation to your new employer and why you're interested in having them buy out your notice period. Be prepared to offer them a compelling reason for why it's in their best interest to do so. For example, you could highlight your valuable skills and experience, or offer to sign a longer contract with them in exchange for the buyout.

Once you've made your case, it's important to be prepared to negotiate. Be open to compromises, such as extending your notice period by a few weeks, or agreeing to a reduced salary during the buyout period. By being flexible and willing to negotiate, you can increase your chances of reaching a mutually beneficial agreement.

In conclusion, while it's not always possible to ask your new employer to buy out your old company's notice period, it's worth considering if it's a viable option for your situation. Just be sure to understand the legal implications, consider the potential impact on your relationship with your current employer, and be prepared to negotiate with your new employer. By doing your due diligence and approaching the situation carefully, you can increase your chances of successfully securing a buyout.


FAQ #1: Can I ask my new employer to buy out my old company's notice period?

In short, it's not uncommon for a new employer to agree to buy out an employee's notice period. However, the decision to do so ultimately lies with the new employer.

It's important to understand the legal implications of asking your new employer to buy out your old company's notice period. In some cases, it may be considered a breach of contract to leave your current employer before the end of your notice period. This could potentially result in legal action being taken against you. Before making a decision, it's a good idea to speak with a lawyer to understand your rights and responsibilities.

FAQ #2: How do I approach my new employer about buying out my notice period?

If you decide to ask your new employer to buy out your old company's notice period, it's important to approach the situation with a clear plan in mind. You'll need to negotiate with them to come to an agreement that works for both parties.

Start by explaining the situation to your new employer and why you're interested in having them buy out your notice period. Be prepared to offer them a compelling reason for why it's in their best interest to do so. For example, you could highlight your valuable skills and experience, or offer to sign a longer contract with them in exchange for the buyout.

Once you've made your case, it's important to be prepared to negotiate. Be open to compromises, such as extending your notice period by a few weeks, or agreeing to a reduced salary during the buyout period. By being flexible and willing to negotiate, you can increase your chances of reaching a mutually beneficial agreement.

FAQ #3: What if my new employer refuses to buy out my notice period?

If your new employer refuses to buy out your notice period, it's important to take their decision into consideration and weigh the potential consequences. In some cases, it may be best to serve out your notice period with your current employer rather than risk damaging your relationship with them or facing legal action.

Alternatively, you could try to negotiate a shorter notice period with your current employer. They may be willing to come to an agreement that allows you to leave sooner in exchange for something, such as a payout or a positive reference. By being open to negotiation, you may be able to find a solution that works for both parties.



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